Inherited Law Madness

  1. Coroners. Shortly after the Norman Conquest, Richard the First instituted the office of the Crown with very loose expectations. Anyone who found a murder victim was supposed to report the crime to the king’s representative so he could supervise the locals and prevent them from pocketing fines and such that were supposed to be sent along to the royal treasury. The office has changed dramatically over the centuries and been transplanted in many countries, but the core idea hangs around.
  2. Precedent. Mainland Europeans found it baffling in the high Middle Ages that Anglo judges and juries relied on prior rulings to judge new situations. We still use it, and it still baffles others.
  3. Grand Juries. In the trials article I just did, I mentioned that England used a jury of presentiment to decide if a trial was warranted. This evolved into the Grand Juries we use now.

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Vivian Yongewa

Vivian Yongewa

Writes for content farms and fun. Has an AU historical mystery series on Kindle.